One of the most nerve-wracking stages of the job search is undoubtedly the interview. When going for a job interview, it is essential to take care of all the aspects that allow a good conversation

One of the most nerve-wracking stages of the job search is undoubtedly the interview. When going for a job interview, it is essential to take care of all the aspects that allow a good conversation and impression to be made. So, to a greater or lesser extent, for everyone, interviews generate nerves, worry, stress, or even anxiety; we usually talk to people close to us, friends or colleagues in search of advice to help us feel more prepared and subdue those not so positive feelings that dominate us.

However, sometimes these tips are not so realistic, nor the interpretation we give to them. Rather than helping us, they lead us away from the image of ourselves we want to project to the interviewer.

That is why we are going to discuss some of the most commonly shared tips, that can derail your interview!

Tip#1: "Dress formally to give a good image"

- The interpretation: wear formal attire to the interview that is incongruent with the workplace.

The image we project is indeed especially important when we are going to offer our professional profile in an interview, but a formal three-piece suit in gentlemen or an overloaded makeup in ladies, beyond help can result in a negative assessment of us.  Be clean and neat, yes, but keep in mind, what position are you applying for, what is the company you are applying for, is it a traditional office position, or a front-office position? The answers to these questions can guide you much more clearly than a simple: dress formally.

Tip # 2: "Be prepared and informed for the interview."

- The interpretation: read and review information about what you think is required for the vacancy; and superficial information about the company.

Before going to an interview we must handle information, that is true. First of all, about the company to have context and understanding about where we are applying. But the preparation that is so recommended to have done before an interview, is about ourselves. Spend time analyzing yourself to find your strengths and value your successes, look for concrete examples to cite in the business context to which you are applying. The most important thing is that you give examples of how your strengths have made it easier for you to achieve success in your professional career. Also, be clear about your weaknesses, and be prepared to explain how you dealt with them in the past and overcame them, or how you are currently dealing with them so that they do not affect your daily work.

Tips #3: "If your previous job has nothing to do with it or you've been out of work for a while, make something up."

- The interpretation: Fill in the blanks with falsework experience.

In the interview, upon review, you may be asked to explain in detail the positions you have mentioned, to find contradictions or inconsistencies. If you have a poor professional trajectory, "embellishing", "making up", "exaggerating", "omitting" or whatever you call it, is still "lying" and we can assure you that even if at the time you think it worked and you get the job, there will always be the possibility that they discover the lie and you lose the trust of your colleagues or even lose your job. Before you are called in for an interview, be assured that the recruiting team is going to investigate to corroborate as much of your resume as possible. A recruiter is trained to know as much information as possible about candidates and has specific methods for researching and verifying their data.

Being there in that interview speaks of your potential and capabilities for that position, your profile has fit them and they see in you someone valuable for what they are looking for. Trust in yourself, in your virtues, and prepare yourself with confidence to make a good interview. Keep in mind that a company is more likely to hire a candidate who is sincere, competent, and confident than one who is caught by nerves and insecurities in the first interview.